The effect of dynamic vessel motion on haemodynamic parameters in the right coronary artery: A combined MR and CFD study

R. Torii*, J. Keegan, N. B. Wood, A. W. Dowsey, A. D. Hughes, G. Z. Yang, D. N. Firmin, S. A. McG Thom, X. Y. Xu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human right coronary artery (RCA) haemodynamics is investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based on subject-specific information from magnetic resonance (MR) acquisitions. The dynamically varying vascular geometry is reconstructed from MR images, incorporated in CFD in conjunction with pulsatile flow conditions obtained from MR velocity mapping performed on the same subject. The effects of dynamic vessel motion on instantaneous and cycle-averaged haemodynamic parameters, such as wall shear stress (WSS), time-averaged WSS (TAWSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI), are examined by comparing an RCA model with a time-varying geometry and those with a static geometry, corresponding to nine different timepoints in the cardiac cycle. The results show that the TAWSS is similar for the dynamic and static wall models, both qualitatively and quantitatively (correlation coefficient 0.89-0.95). Conversely, the OSI shows much poorer correlations (correlation coefficient 0.38-0.60), with the best correspondence being observed with the static models constructed from images acquired in late diastole (at t=0 and 800 ms, the cardiac cycle is 900 ms). These findings suggest that neglecting dynamic motion of the RCA is acceptable if TAWSS is the primary focus but may result in underestimation of haemodynamic parameters related to the oscillatory nature of the blood flow.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Radiology
Volume82
Issue numberSPEC. ISSUE 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2009

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