Skip to content

The effect of pubertal timing, as reflected by height tempo, on proximal femur shape: findings from a population-based study in adolescents

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Article number115179
Number of pages8
JournalBone
Volume131
Issue numberFebruary 2020
Early online date30 Nov 2019
DOIs
DateAccepted/In press - 27 Nov 2019
DateE-pub ahead of print (current) - 30 Nov 2019

Abstract

Objective
To examine the relationship between pubertal timing (using measures of height tempo) and proximal femur shape in a large adolescent cohort.

Methods
Hip DXA scans were obtained in offspring from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. To quantify hip morphology, the images were analyzed using Shape software based on a 53-point statistical shape model and independent modes of variation (hip shape mode (HSM) scores) for each image were generated. Height tempo (which corresponds to age at peak height velocity (aPHV)) was estimated from serial height measurements collected between age 5–20 years. Multivariable linear regression was used to examine cross-sectional associations between height tempo and the top ten HSMs at age 14 and 18, adjusting for sex and fat mass index (FMI).

Results
Complete outcome and covariate data were available from 3827 and 3507 participants at age 14 and 18 years, respectively. Mean aPHV was 13.5 and 11.8 years for males and females, respectively. At age 14, height tempo was associated with a majority of modes, except for HSM4 and there was strong evidence of interaction by sex. In males, all modes showed evidence of an association with tempo, independent of FMI, with the strongest observed for HSM8 (adjusted β 0.38 (0.33, 0.43) p = 4.1 × 10−50). Compared with males, the associations were generally weaker in females, with the strongest effect observed for HSM8 (adjusted β 0.10 (0.05, 0.14) p = 1.6 × 10−5). The overall effect of later pubertal timing on proximal femur shape in males was a narrower femoral neck and larger superolateral head, whereas in females these changes were hard to discern. When assessed at age 18, there was little relationship between tempo and proximal femur shape in either sex.

Conclusion
Our results indicate that significant changes in hip shape occur during puberty, including aspects of shape which may be related to future risk of hip OA and/or fracture. However, puberty timing per se does not appear to exert long lasting effects on proximal femur shape.

    Research areas

  • ALSPAC, Proximal femur shape, Joint shape, Statistical shape modelling, Pubertal growth

Download statistics

No data available

Documents

Documents

  • Full-text PDF (final published version)

    Rights statement: This is the final published version of the article (version of record). It first appeared online via Elsevier at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2019.115179 . Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

    Final published version, 351 KB, PDF document

    Licence: CC BY

DOI

View research connections

Related faculties, schools or groups