The ethical challenges of experience sampling using wearable cameras

Sze Yin Kwok, Anya Skatova, Victoria Shipp, Andy Crabtree

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Contribution (Conference Proceeding)

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Self-report methods such as experience sampling provide an important means of understanding individual behaviors. The arrival of wearable camera technologies opens up research opportunities to provoke and explore in-depth contextual self-reflection on individual behaviors. Studies with wearable cameras have the potential to extend or/and complement existing experience sampling methods and provide greater insight into human behavior. However, the use of wearable cameras raises distinctive ethical challenges. This paper outlines a number of ethical challenges occasioned by the use of wearable cameras in research, both tractable and intractable.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMobileHCI 2015 - Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services Adjunct
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Pages1054-1057
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781450336536
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Aug 2015
Event17th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services, MobileHCI 2015 - Copenhagen, Denmark
Duration: 24 Aug 201527 Aug 2015

Conference

Conference17th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services, MobileHCI 2015
CountryDenmark
CityCopenhagen
Period24/08/1527/08/15

Keywords

  • Ethical risks
  • Ethics
  • Methods
  • Self-reflection
  • Wearable cameras

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The ethical challenges of experience sampling using wearable cameras'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this