The European Court of Human Rights: an unlikely forum for the enforcement of IP Rights

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter in a book

Abstract



The constitutional limitations of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) constrain the role of the Court in defining the scope of intellectual property rights (IPRs) and their enforcement. This chapter analyses these limitations by explaining the contested origins of the right to property and the paradoxical conferral of property rights to ‘legal persons’; setting out the constitutional constraints on the exercise of the Court’s jurisdiction; and reviewing the Court’s case law on IP rights. These considerations explain the very low volume of IPR applications and why the Court is an unlikely forum for the enforcement of IPRs.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIntellectual Property and the Judiciary
EditorsChristophe Geiger, Craig Allen Nard, Javier Xeuba
PublisherEdward Elgar Publishing
Chapter2
Pages91-115
Number of pages24
ISBN (Print)978 1 78811 307 6
Publication statusPublished - 26 Oct 2018

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