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The evaporation kinetics of pure water droplets at varying drying rates and the use of evaporation rates to infer the gas phase relative humidity

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The evaporation kinetics of pure water droplets at varying drying rates and the use of evaporation rates to infer the gas phase relative humidity. / Su, Yong-yang; Miles, Rachael; Li, Zhi-ming; Reid, Jonathan; Xu, Jiang.

In: Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, Vol. 20, No. 36, 28.09.2018, p. 23453-23466.

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Su, Yong-yang ; Miles, Rachael ; Li, Zhi-ming ; Reid, Jonathan ; Xu, Jiang. / The evaporation kinetics of pure water droplets at varying drying rates and the use of evaporation rates to infer the gas phase relative humidity. In: Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics. 2018 ; Vol. 20, No. 36. pp. 23453-23466.

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@article{034a3ad1f4d745868dff0d3758a05ab3,
title = "The evaporation kinetics of pure water droplets at varying drying rates and the use of evaporation rates to infer the gas phase relative humidity",
abstract = "Numerous analytical models have been applied to describe the evaporation/condensation kinetics of volatile components from aerosol particles for use in many applications. However, the applicability of these models for treating cases that lead to substantial and rapid changes in particle temperature due to, for example, evaporative cooling remain to be compared with measurements. We consider three typical treatments, comparing predictions of the evaporation rates of pure water droplets over a wide range in gas phase relative humidity (RH) and exploring the sensitivity of the predictions to uncertainties in the thermophysical gas and condensed-phase parameters. We also compare predictions from the three treatments to measurements of the evaporation rates of pure water droplets with varying RH using an electrodynamic balance (EDB), concluding that only two of the model treatments are sufficiently able to account for the level of evaporative cooling (typically as high as 12 K). Finally, we show that the RH can be inferred accurately from the evaporation rate of pure water droplets over the full range in accessible RH and comparison with the model predictions (within absolute uncertainties of 2.5{\%} RH over the range 20{\%} to 95{\%} RH), considering the level of agreement with independent measurements made through determining the equilibrated size of aqueous sodium chloride and sodium nitrate droplets.",
author = "Yong-yang Su and Rachael Miles and Zhi-ming Li and Jonathan Reid and Jiang Xu",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1039/C8CP05250F",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "23453--23466",
journal = "Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics",
issn = "1463-9076",
publisher = "The Royal Society of Chemistry",
number = "36",

}

RIS - suitable for import to EndNote

TY - JOUR

T1 - The evaporation kinetics of pure water droplets at varying drying rates and the use of evaporation rates to infer the gas phase relative humidity

AU - Su, Yong-yang

AU - Miles, Rachael

AU - Li, Zhi-ming

AU - Reid, Jonathan

AU - Xu, Jiang

PY - 2018/9/28

Y1 - 2018/9/28

N2 - Numerous analytical models have been applied to describe the evaporation/condensation kinetics of volatile components from aerosol particles for use in many applications. However, the applicability of these models for treating cases that lead to substantial and rapid changes in particle temperature due to, for example, evaporative cooling remain to be compared with measurements. We consider three typical treatments, comparing predictions of the evaporation rates of pure water droplets over a wide range in gas phase relative humidity (RH) and exploring the sensitivity of the predictions to uncertainties in the thermophysical gas and condensed-phase parameters. We also compare predictions from the three treatments to measurements of the evaporation rates of pure water droplets with varying RH using an electrodynamic balance (EDB), concluding that only two of the model treatments are sufficiently able to account for the level of evaporative cooling (typically as high as 12 K). Finally, we show that the RH can be inferred accurately from the evaporation rate of pure water droplets over the full range in accessible RH and comparison with the model predictions (within absolute uncertainties of 2.5% RH over the range 20% to 95% RH), considering the level of agreement with independent measurements made through determining the equilibrated size of aqueous sodium chloride and sodium nitrate droplets.

AB - Numerous analytical models have been applied to describe the evaporation/condensation kinetics of volatile components from aerosol particles for use in many applications. However, the applicability of these models for treating cases that lead to substantial and rapid changes in particle temperature due to, for example, evaporative cooling remain to be compared with measurements. We consider three typical treatments, comparing predictions of the evaporation rates of pure water droplets over a wide range in gas phase relative humidity (RH) and exploring the sensitivity of the predictions to uncertainties in the thermophysical gas and condensed-phase parameters. We also compare predictions from the three treatments to measurements of the evaporation rates of pure water droplets with varying RH using an electrodynamic balance (EDB), concluding that only two of the model treatments are sufficiently able to account for the level of evaporative cooling (typically as high as 12 K). Finally, we show that the RH can be inferred accurately from the evaporation rate of pure water droplets over the full range in accessible RH and comparison with the model predictions (within absolute uncertainties of 2.5% RH over the range 20% to 95% RH), considering the level of agreement with independent measurements made through determining the equilibrated size of aqueous sodium chloride and sodium nitrate droplets.

U2 - 10.1039/C8CP05250F

DO - 10.1039/C8CP05250F

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 23453

EP - 23466

JO - Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics

JF - Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics

SN - 1463-9076

IS - 36

ER -