The Evidence so far- a Guide to Assessment in Dental Education

Julie Williams, Sarah Baillie, Sheena Warman, Susan M Rhind, Jonathan Sandy, Anthony Ireland

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference Poster

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Abstract

The Evidence so far- a Guide to Assessment in Dental Education

Julie Williams*, School of Oral and Dental Sciences, University of Bristol
Sarah Baillie, School of Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol
Sheena Warman, School of Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol
Susan Rhind, Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh
Jonathan Sandy, School of Oral and Dental Sciences, University of Bristol
Anthony Ireland, School of Oral and Dental Sciences, University of Bristol

Aim of this work: The term assessment derives from the Latin “assidere” meaning to sit beside, suggesting that the assessor and the student travel together side by side on the journey to learn. Training the competent dentist requires evaluation against a series of standards. Our aim was to gather together current evidence for tools used for these two processes of assessment and evaluation as part of curriculum planning which, in turn, enhances the learning and development of successful dentists.

Summary of work: Methods used to assess the dental undergraduate and postgraduate were considered. A review of the literature included dental student, tutor and patient perceptions and evidence for the validity, reliability, educational impact, acceptability and cost of assessment methods.

Summary of results: A guide to dental assessment was developed based on the literature review and utilising a successful format already adopted in veterinary medicine1. The guidebook includes a short summary describing each assessment method and considerations for both new and experienced dental educators at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

Discussion: Synthesising the literature in an accessible format for colleagues aims to support staff development and on-going modernisation of assessment.

Conclusion: There is a body of evidence to support the use of a wide range of assessment methods although some score more highly in the utility equation than others.

Take home messages: This guide aims to promote the use of appropriate assessment methods within undergraduate and postgraduate dental education and is freely available online2.

1. Baillie, S., Warman, S., Rhind, S. (2014). A Guide to Assessment in Veterinary Medical Education 2nd ed.

2. Williams JC, Baillie S, Rhind S, Warman S, Sandy J, Ireland A. (2016) A Guide to Assessment in Dental Education
Available from: https://www.ole.bris.ac.uk/webapps/cmsmain/webui/_xy-7221180_1?action=ittach.[Accessed on 23 March 2016]
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 24 Aug 2016
EventAssociation for Dental Education in Europe Conference - Faculty of Dentistry, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
Duration: 24 Aug 201627 Aug 2016

Conference

ConferenceAssociation for Dental Education in Europe Conference
Abbreviated titleADEE conference
CountrySpain
CityBarcelona
Period24/08/1627/08/16

Keywords

  • Assessment
  • Dental education

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  • Cite this

    Williams, J., Baillie, S., Warman, S., Rhind, S. M., Sandy, J., & Ireland, A. (2016). The Evidence so far- a Guide to Assessment in Dental Education. Poster session presented at Association for Dental Education in Europe Conference, Barcelona, Spain.