The factory, the antenna and the scaffold: the three-way interplay between the Golgi, cilium and extracellular matrix underlying tissue function

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Abstract

The growth and development of healthy tissues is dependent on the
construction of a highly specialised extracellular matrix (ECM) to
provide support for cell growth and migration and to determine the
biomechanical properties of the tissue. These scaffolds are
composed of extensively glycosylated proteins which are secreted
and assembled into well-ordered structures that can hydrate,
mineralise, and store growth factors as required. The proteolytic
processing and glycosylation of ECM components is vital to their
function. These modifications are under the control of the Golgi
apparatus, an intracellular factory hosting spatially organised, proteinmodifying enzymes. Regulation also requires a cellular antenna, the
cilium, which integrates extracellular growth signals and mechanical
cues to inform ECM production. Consequently, mutations in either
Golgi or ciliary genes frequently lead to connective tissue disorders.
The individual importance of each of these organelles to ECM
function is well-studied. However, emerging evidence points towards
a more tightly linked system of interdependence between the Golgi,
cilium and ECM. This review examines how the interplay between all
three compartments underpins healthy tissue. As an example, it will
look at several members of the golgin family of Golgi-resident proteins
whose loss is detrimental to connective tissue function. This
perspective will be important for many future studies looking to
dissect the cause and effect of mutations impacting tissue integrity.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberbio059719
JournalBiology Open
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Feb 2023

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