The increase in health care costs associated with muscle weakness in older people without long-term illnesses in the Czech Republic: results from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE)

Michal Steffl, Jan Sima, Kate Shiells, Iva Holmerova

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

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Abstract

Muscle weakness and associated diseases are likely to place a considerable economic burden on government health care expenditure. Therefore, our aim for this study was to estimate the direct and indirect costs associated with muscle weakness in the Czech Republic. We applied a cost-of-illness approach using data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). Six hundred and eighty-nine participants aged 70 years and over and without any long-term illnesses were included in our study. A generalized linear model with gamma distribution was used, and odds ratio (OR) was calculated in order to explore the effect of muscle weakness on direct and indirect costs. For both genders, muscle weakness had a statistically significant impact on direct costs (OR =2.11), but did not have a statistically significant impact on indirect costs (OR =1.08) or on total cost (OR =1.51). Muscle weakness had the greatest statistically significant impact on direct costs in females (OR =2.75). In conclusion, our study has shown that muscle weakness may lead to increased direct costs, and consequently place a burden on health care expenditure. Therefore, the results of this study could lead to greater interest in the prevention of muscle weakness among older people in the Czech Republic.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2003-2007
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Interventions in Aging
Volume12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Nov 2017

Structured keywords

  • Physical and Mental Health

Keywords

  • frailty
  • sarcopenia
  • economic burden
  • indirect cost
  • direct cost

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