The influence of dietary field peas (Pisum sativum L.) on pig performance, carcass quality, and the palatability of pork

H H Stein, A K R Everts, K K Sweeter, D N Peters, R J Maddock, D M Wulf, C Pedersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that field peas may replace soybean meal in diets fed to growing and finishing pigs without negatively influencing pig performance, carcass quality, or pork palatability. Forty-eight pigs (initial average BW 22.7 +/- 1.21 kg) were allotted to 1 of 3 treatments with 2 pigs per pen. There were 8 replications per treatment, 4 with barrows and 4 with gilts. The treatments were control, medium field peas, and maximum field peas. Pigs were fed grower diets for 35 d, early finisher diets for 35 d, and late finisher diets for 45 d. Pigs receiving the control treatment were fed corn-soybean meal diets. All diets fed to pigs receiving the medium field peas treatment contained 36% field peas and varying amounts of corn; soybean meal was also included in the grower and the early finisher diets fed to pigs on this treatment. In contrast, no soybean meal was included in diets fed to pigs on the maximum field peas treatment, and field peas were included at concentrations of 66, 48, and 36% in the grower, early finisher, and late finisher diets, respectively. Pig performance was monitored within each phase and for the entire experimental period. At the conclusion of the experiment, carcass composition, carcass quality, and the palatability of pork chops and pork patties were measured. Results showed that there were no effects of dietary treatments on ADFI, ADG, or G:F. Likewise, there were no differences in carcass composition among the treatment groups, but gilts had larger (P = 0.001) and deeper (P = 0.003) LM, less backfat (P = 0.007), and a greater (P = 0.002) lean meat percentage than barrows. The pH and marbling of the LM, and the 10th rib backfat were not influenced by treatment, but there was a trend (P = 0.10) for more marbling in barrows than in gilts. The subjective color scores (P = 0.003) and the objective color score (P = 0.06) indicated that dietary field peas made the LM darker and more desirable. Pork chops from pigs fed field peas also had less (P = 0.02) moisture loss compared with chops from pigs fed the control diet. Treatment or sex did not influence palatability of pork chops or pork patties. In conclusion, field peas may replace all of the soybean meal in diets fed to growing and finishing pigs without negatively influencing pig performance, carcass composition, carcass quality, or pork palatability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3110-7
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Animal Science
Volume84
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2006

Keywords

  • Animal Feed
  • Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
  • Animals
  • Body Composition
  • Diet
  • Female
  • Male
  • Meat
  • Peas
  • Swine
  • Controlled Clinical Trial
  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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