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The influence of visual flow and perceptual load on locomotion speed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-81
Number of pages13
JournalAttention, Perception, and Psychophysics
Volume80
Issue number1
Early online date19 Sep 2017
DOIs
DateAccepted/In press - 16 Aug 2017
DateE-pub ahead of print - 19 Sep 2017
DatePublished (current) - 1 Jan 2018

Abstract

Visual flow is used to perceive and regulate movement speed during locomotion. We assessed the extent to which variation in flow from the ground plane, arising from static visual textures, influences locomotion speed under conditions of concurrent perceptual load. In two experiments, participants walked over a 12-m projected walkway that consisted of stripes that were oriented orthogonal to the walking direction. In the critical conditions, the frequency of the stripes increased or decreased. We observed small, but consistent effects on walking speed, so that participants were walking slower when the frequency increased compared to when the frequency decreased. This basic effect suggests that participants interpreted the change in visual flow in these conditions as at least partly due to a change in their own movement speed, and counteracted such a change by speeding up or slowing down. Critically, these effects were magnified under conditions of low perceptual load and a locus of attention near the ground plane. Our findings suggest that the contribution of vision in the control of ongoing locomotion is relatively fluid and dependent on ongoing perceptual (and perhaps more generally cognitive) task demands.

    Structured keywords

  • Cognitive Science
  • Visual Perception

    Research areas

  • Locomotion, Visual flow, Self-motion, Dual-task, Perceptual load

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    Rights statement: This is the final published version of the article (version of record). It first appeared online via Springer at https://link.springer.com/article/10.3758%2Fs13414-017-1417-3. Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

    Final published version, 846 KB, PDF document

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  • Supplementary information PDF

    Rights statement: This is the final published version of the article (version of record). It first appeared online via Springer at https://link.springer.com/article/10.3758%2Fs13414-017-1417-3. Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

    Final published version, 447 KB, PDF document

    Licence: CC BY

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