The interactome of the human respiratory syncytial virus NS1 protein highlights multiple effects on host cell biology

Weining Wu, Kim C Tran, Michael N Teng, Kate J Heesom, David A Matthews, John N Barr, Julian A Hiscox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Viral proteins can have multiple effects on host cell biology. Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a good example of this. During the virus life cycle, NS1 can act as an antagonist of host type I and III interferon production and signaling, inhibit apoptosis, suppress dendritic cell maturation, control protein stability, and regulate transcription of host cell mRNAs, among other functions. It is likely that NS1 performs these different roles through interactions with multiple host cell proteins. To investigate this and identify cellular proteins that could interact with NS1, we used quantitative proteomics in combination with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-trap immunoprecipitation and bioinformatic analysis. This analysis identified 221 proteins that were potentially part of complexes that could interact with NS1, with many of these associated with transcriptional regulation as part of the mediator complex, cell cycle regulation, and other functions previously assigned to NS1. Specific immunoprecipitation using the GFP trap was used to confirm the ability of selected cellular proteins to interact individually with NS1. Infection of A549 cells with recombinant viruses deficient in the expression of NS1 and overexpression analysis both demonstrated that NS1 was necessary and sufficient for the enrichment of cells in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7777-89
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume86
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2012

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The interactome of the human respiratory syncytial virus NS1 protein highlights multiple effects on host cell biology'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this