The kapok tree (Ceiba pentandra (L.) Gaertn, Malvaceae) as a food source for native vertebrate species during times of resource scarcity and its potential for reforestation in Madagascar

Daniel Hending*, Heriniaina Randrianarison, Marc Holderied, Grainne McCabe, Sam Cotton

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

2 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Reforestation in Madagascar often relies on a few tree species with known properties. Species selection may consider aspects like human use, growth characteristics and animal use. Here, we investigated the use of the kapok tree (Ceiba pentandra) as a food source for vertebrates during the dry season in North West Madagascar. We observed 21 native vertebrate species (five lemurs, five bats and 11 birds) feed on or within C. pentandra during this period of low food availability, 48% of which are known seed dispersers. As a fast-growing species, C. pentandra may therefore be suitable for inclusion in reforestation and forest restoration efforts to facilitate seed dispersal, natural forest regeneration and animal movement between adjacent forest fragments.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAustral Ecology
Early online date29 Jun 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 29 Jun 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank National Geographic Society, La Vallée des Singes, Primate Conservation Incorporated, IdeaWild, Global Wildlife Conservation, Primate Society of Great Britain, and University of Bristol and AEECL for funding this research. We thank MICET for logistical support and Madagascar National Parks for granting a research permit (245/19‐MEEF/SG/DGF/DSAP/SCB. Re). We are grateful to all field guides, cooks and porters that assisted this research.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Authors. Austral Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Ecological Society of Australia

Keywords

  • connectivity
  • food source
  • neophyte
  • pamba
  • seed dispersers

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The kapok tree (Ceiba pentandra (L.) Gaertn, Malvaceae) as a food source for native vertebrate species during times of resource scarcity and its potential for reforestation in Madagascar'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this