The North-South Politics of Necessity: Regulating for Basic Rights Between National and International Levels

BM Morgan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper outlines the regulatory politics that characterise debates about providing basic necessities in the context of increasing global economic integration and a continuing policy emphasis on market-based systems of provision. These politics arise from a growing convergence between consumerism, markets and a right of access to basic goods and essential services. The paper provides a brief overview of contemporary policy issues relating to access to water, followed by a conceptual analysis of how these issues relate to regulation, markets and rights. The second half assesses empirical developments in the area, focusing on the political implications for relationships between developed and developing countries.
Translated title of the contributionThe North-South Politics of Necessity: Regulating for Basic Rights Between National and International Levels
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)465 - 487
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Consumer Policy
Volume29 (4)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2006

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Springer
Other: Special Issue on 'The Politics of Necessity', edited by Bronwen Morgan and Frank Trentmann

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