The Perils of Collective Begging: the case for reforming collective labour law globally and locally too

Tonia Novitz*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

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Abstract

This article explores the consequences of “collective begging”, that is the failure to provide meaningful legal protection and support for collective bargaining. The first part identifies the perils we are now facing, including increasing precarious work, growing economic inequality and diminished democratic engagement. The second part considers our journey here, namely how we took our (collective) eye off the ball and enabled “begging” rather than “bargaining”. Finally, the third part considers potential legal solutions, including expanding the coverage of those at work legally entitled to trade union representation, facilitating sectoral bargaining and enlarging the scope for lawful industrial action.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-19
Number of pages16
JournalNew Zealand Journal of Employment Relations
Volume44
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2020

Structured keywords

  • Perspectives on Work
  • LAW Centre for Law at Work

Keywords

  • collective bargaining
  • ILO
  • precarious work
  • right to strike

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