The potential role of unregulated autonomous bladder micromotions in urinary storage and voiding dysfunction; overactive bladder and detrusor underactivity

Marcus J. Drake*, Anthony Kanai, Dominika A. Bijos, Youko Ikeda, Irina Zabbarova, Bahareh Vahabi, Christopher H. Fry

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

39 Citations (Scopus)
193 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The isolated bladder shows autonomous micromotions, which increase with bladder distension, generate sensory nerve activity, and are altered in models of urinary dysfunction. Intravesical pressure resulting from autonomous activity putatively reflects three key variables; the extent of micromotion initiation, distances over which micromotions propagate, and overall bladder tone. In vivo, these variables are subordinate to the efferent drive of the central nervous system. In the micturition cycle storage phase, efferent inhibition keeps autonomous activity generally at a low level, where it may signal 'state of fullness', whilst maintaining compliance. In the voiding phase, mass efferent excitation elicits generalised contraction (global motility initiation). In lower urinary tract dysfunction, efferent control of the bladder can be impaired, for example due to peripheral 'patchy' denervation. In this case, loss of efferent inhibition may enable unregulated micromotility, and afferent stimulation, predisposing to urinary urgency. If denervation is relatively slight, the detrimental impact on voiding may be low, as the adjacent innervated areas may be able to initiate micromotility synchronous with the efferent nerve drive, so that even denervated areas can contribute to the voiding contraction. This would become increasingly inefficient the more severe the denervation, such that ability of triggered micromotility to propagate sufficiently to engage the denervated areas in voiding declines, so the voiding contraction increasingly develops the characteristics of underactivity. In summary, reduced peripheral coverage by the dual efferent innervation (inhibitory and excitatory) impairs regulation of micromotility initiation and propagation, potentially allowing emergence of overactive bladder and, with progression, detrusor underactivity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-29
Number of pages8
JournalBJU International
Volume119
Issue number1
Early online date23 Aug 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2017

Structured keywords

  • Centre for Surgical Research

Keywords

  • LUTS
  • Detrusor overactivity
  • Detrusor underactivity
  • Micromotions
  • Overactive bladder
  • Urodynamics

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