The proof of the pudding: what difference does multi-agency working make to families with disabled children with complex health care needs?

DWF Abbott, DA Watson, RJ Townsley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

More than 20 years of research with disabled children, young people and their families has highlighted the need for the different professionals and services that support them to work more closely together. The British policy and legal framework for 'joined up working' has never been stronger. However, there has been an assumption that multi- or inter-agency working will inevitably be a 'good thing' for families. This paper discusses findings from a 3-year research project which looked at both the process and impact of multi-agency working on families with a disabled child with complex health care needs. Interviews with 25 parents and 18 children and young people who used six developed, multi-agency services were carried out. Findings suggested that the services had made a big difference to the health care needs of disabled children but were less able to meet the wider needs of the child and the family – particularly in relation to social and emotional needs. Multi-agency working appeared to make some positive, but not significant, differences to the lives of families.
Translated title of the contributionThe proof of the pudding: what difference does multi-agency working make to families with disabled children with complex health care needs?
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)229 - 238
Number of pages12
JournalChild and Family Social Work
Volume10 (3)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2005

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Blackwell
Other identifier: 3

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