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The race to the bottom: Approaching the ideal glass?

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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The race to the bottom : Approaching the ideal glass? / Royall, Cp; Turci, Francesco; Tatsumi, Soichi; Russo, John; Robinson, Joshua.

In: Journal of Physics Condensed Matter, Vol. 30, No. 36, 363001, 12.09.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Harvard

Royall, C, Turci, F, Tatsumi, S, Russo, J & Robinson, J 2018, 'The race to the bottom: Approaching the ideal glass?', Journal of Physics Condensed Matter, vol. 30, no. 36, 363001. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-648X/aad10a

APA

Royall, C., Turci, F., Tatsumi, S., Russo, J., & Robinson, J. (2018). The race to the bottom: Approaching the ideal glass? Journal of Physics Condensed Matter, 30(36), [363001]. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-648X/aad10a

Vancouver

Royall C, Turci F, Tatsumi S, Russo J, Robinson J. The race to the bottom: Approaching the ideal glass? Journal of Physics Condensed Matter. 2018 Sep 12;30(36). 363001. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-648X/aad10a

Author

Royall, Cp ; Turci, Francesco ; Tatsumi, Soichi ; Russo, John ; Robinson, Joshua. / The race to the bottom : Approaching the ideal glass?. In: Journal of Physics Condensed Matter. 2018 ; Vol. 30, No. 36.

Bibtex

@article{be9f226fefbd4a07b3c87083bf6b9b14,
title = "The race to the bottom: Approaching the ideal glass?",
abstract = "Key to resolving the scientific challenge of the glass transition is to understand the origin of the massive increase in viscosity of liquids cooled below their melting temperature (avoiding crystallisation). A number of competing and often mutually exclusive theoretical approaches have been advanced to describe this phenomenon. Some posit a bona fide thermodynamic phase to an 'ideal glass', an amorphous state with exceptionally low entropy. Other approaches are built around the concept of the glass transition as a primarily dynamic phenomenon. These fundamentally different interpretations give equally good descriptions of the data available, so it is hard to determine which - if any - is correct. Recently however this situation has begun to change. A consensus has emerged that one powerful means to resolve this longstanding question is to approach the putative thermodynamic transition sufficiently closely, and a number of techniques have emerged to meet this challenge. Here we review the results of some of these new techniques and discuss the implications for the existence - or otherwise - of the thermodynamic transition to an ideal glass.",
keywords = "aging, energy landscape, glass transition, Kauzmann temperature, ultrastable glass",
author = "Cp Royall and Francesco Turci and Soichi Tatsumi and John Russo and Joshua Robinson",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1088/1361-648X/aad10a",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
journal = "Journal of Physics Condensed Matter",
issn = "0953-8984",
publisher = "IOP Publishing",
number = "36",

}

RIS - suitable for import to EndNote

TY - JOUR

T1 - The race to the bottom

T2 - Approaching the ideal glass?

AU - Royall, Cp

AU - Turci, Francesco

AU - Tatsumi, Soichi

AU - Russo, John

AU - Robinson, Joshua

PY - 2018/9/12

Y1 - 2018/9/12

N2 - Key to resolving the scientific challenge of the glass transition is to understand the origin of the massive increase in viscosity of liquids cooled below their melting temperature (avoiding crystallisation). A number of competing and often mutually exclusive theoretical approaches have been advanced to describe this phenomenon. Some posit a bona fide thermodynamic phase to an 'ideal glass', an amorphous state with exceptionally low entropy. Other approaches are built around the concept of the glass transition as a primarily dynamic phenomenon. These fundamentally different interpretations give equally good descriptions of the data available, so it is hard to determine which - if any - is correct. Recently however this situation has begun to change. A consensus has emerged that one powerful means to resolve this longstanding question is to approach the putative thermodynamic transition sufficiently closely, and a number of techniques have emerged to meet this challenge. Here we review the results of some of these new techniques and discuss the implications for the existence - or otherwise - of the thermodynamic transition to an ideal glass.

AB - Key to resolving the scientific challenge of the glass transition is to understand the origin of the massive increase in viscosity of liquids cooled below their melting temperature (avoiding crystallisation). A number of competing and often mutually exclusive theoretical approaches have been advanced to describe this phenomenon. Some posit a bona fide thermodynamic phase to an 'ideal glass', an amorphous state with exceptionally low entropy. Other approaches are built around the concept of the glass transition as a primarily dynamic phenomenon. These fundamentally different interpretations give equally good descriptions of the data available, so it is hard to determine which - if any - is correct. Recently however this situation has begun to change. A consensus has emerged that one powerful means to resolve this longstanding question is to approach the putative thermodynamic transition sufficiently closely, and a number of techniques have emerged to meet this challenge. Here we review the results of some of these new techniques and discuss the implications for the existence - or otherwise - of the thermodynamic transition to an ideal glass.

KW - aging

KW - energy landscape

KW - glass transition

KW - Kauzmann temperature

KW - ultrastable glass

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85052724971&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1088/1361-648X/aad10a

DO - 10.1088/1361-648X/aad10a

M3 - Review article

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JO - Journal of Physics Condensed Matter

JF - Journal of Physics Condensed Matter

SN - 0953-8984

IS - 36

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ER -