The relationship between attachment style and placement of parents in adults’ attachment networks over time

Angela Rowe, Fay Julal, katherine B Carnelley

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference Paper

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using a bull’s-eye hierarchical mapping technique (HMT), the present study examined placement of parents in adults’ attachment networks over time. We hypothesised that attachment style would predict distance at which network members (mother, father, romantic partner) would be placed from the core-self over time. Participants completed the HMT on two occasions, 12-months apart. Concurrently and over time, fathers were placed further from the core-self than mothers. Attachment style explained unique variance, beyond that accounted for by individual and relationship characteristics. Specifically, network members with whom participants reported greater attachment insecurity were placed further from the core-self concurrently. Mothers with whom participants reported greater attachment insecurity were placed further from the core-self over time. Unsatisfactory attachment relationships with father and partner and those marked by higher attachment insecurity were more likely to be excluded from attachment networks over time. Findings suggest that attachment style, relationship quality, romantic relationship status, and parents’ marital status determine the placement of parents in adults’ attachment networks.
Original languageEnglish
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Structured keywords

  • Cognitive Science
  • Social Cognition

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