The renegotiation of social identities in response to a threat to self-evaluation maintenance

MT Crawford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two experiments examine the strategic re-negotiation of social identities as a method of alleviating threats to self-evaluation. Participants were given a partner who shared one, and had one non-shared identity. After completing a self-relevant or non-self-relevant task, participants received either no feedback or learned that they had performed poorly compared to the partner. Participants showed identity distancing in response to being outperformed on a self-relevant task, but affiliation in response to being outperformed on a non-self-relevant task. This effect was reversed when participants were given the opportunity to self-affirm after the feedback. Overall, the results provide evidence that individuals are quite adept at altering their self-categorizations and that self-evaluation serves an important role in identity selection. Results are discussed in relation to the substitutability of self-esteem maintenance mechanisms and self-definition.
Translated title of the contributionThe renegotiation of social identities in response to a threat to self-evaluation maintenance
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)39 - 47
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume43 (1)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2007

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Elsevier

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