The Role of Suicide Risk in the Decision for Psychiatric Hospitalization After a Suicide Attempt

Marta Miret, Roberto Nuevo, Consuelo Morant, Enrique Sainz-Corton, Miguel Angel Jimenez-Arriero, Juan J. Lopez-Ibor, Blanca Reneses, Jeronimo Saiz-Ruiz, Enrique Baca-Garcia, Jose Luis Ayuso-Mateos*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Suicide prevention can be improved by knowing which variables physicians take into account when considering hospitalization or discharge of patients who have attempted suicide. Aims: To test whether suicide risk is an adequate explanatory variable for predicting admission to a psychiatric unit after a suicide attempt. Methods: Analyses of 840 clinical records of patients who had attempted suicide (66.3% women) at four public general hospitals in Madrid (Spain). Results: 180 (21.4%) patients were admitted to psychiatric units. Logistic regression analyses showed that explanatory variables predicting admission were: male gender; previous psychiatric hospitalization; psychiatric disorder; not having a substance-related disorder; use of a lethal method; delay until discovery of more than one hour; previous attempts; suicidal ideation; high suicidal planning; and lack of verbalization of adequate criticism of the attempt. Conclusions: Suicide risk appears to be an adequate explanatory variable for predicting the decision to admit a patient to a psychiatric ward after a suicide attempt, although the introduction of other variables improves the model. These results provide additional information regarding factors involved in everyday medical practice in emergency settings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-73
Number of pages9
JournalCrisis: Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords

  • suicide
  • emergency services
  • psychiatric
  • patient admission
  • logistic regression
  • observational descriptive study
  • EMERGENCY
  • MANAGEMENT
  • SERVICE
  • ADULTS
  • HARM

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