The short-term memory (d.c. response) of the memristor demonstrates the causes of the memristor frequency effect

Ella Gale, Ben De Lacy Costello, Victor Erokhin, Andrew Adamatzky

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Contribution (Conference Proceeding)

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A memristor is often identified by showing its distinctive pinched hysteresis curve and testing for the effect of frequency. The hysteresis size should relate to frequency and shrink to zero as the frequency approaches infinity. Although mathematically understood, the material causes for this are not well known. The d.c. response of the memristor is a decaying curve with its own timescale. We show via mathematical reasoning that this decaying curve when transformed to a.c. leads to the frequency effect by considering a descretized curve. We then demonstrate the validity of this approach with experimental data from two different types of memristors.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2014 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS 2014)
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of a meeting held 1-5 June 2014, Melbourne, Australia
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages2812-2815
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781479934324
ISBN (Print)9781479934331
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2014
Event2014 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems, ISCAS 2014 - Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Duration: 1 Jun 20145 Jun 2014

Conference

Conference2014 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems, ISCAS 2014
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne, VIC
Period1/06/145/06/14

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