The true world's first sculptures of antediluvian animals, which never were...

Fabien Knoll*, Raquel López-Antoñanzas

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

In 1852, the French state commissioned the artists Frémiet and Jacquemart to execute bronzes of a plesiosaur and a pterodactyl for the Jardin des Plantes in Paris. The orders were cancelled before the sculptures could be realized, largely because of petty jealousies among the professors of the Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, who maintained that the long-extinct animals were too poorly understood for accurate reconstructions. In this way an important opportunity to educate and inspire the French public about the life of the past was lost.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)597-604
Number of pages8
JournalComptes Rendus Palevol
Volume10
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2011

Keywords

  • 1852
  • Frémiet
  • History of science
  • Jacquemart
  • Paris
  • Plesiosauria
  • Pterosauria

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