The UN Convention on rights of persons with disabilities: A framework for ethical and inclusive practice?

Kelley Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

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Abstract

The Un Convention on teh Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) was passed in 2006 and came into force in 2008. It sets out a number of core values, including dignity, individual autonomy, nondiscrimination, participaton and community inclusion. Although the CRPD has been recognised as an important step forward by many disabled peopel and their supporters and provdies the foundation for building a good life, the author argues that it does not necesarily equate with it. The underpinning Western values of choice, indpenedence and control are imprtant, but leave out groups of marginalised peopel for whom these goals may not be achievable. They also present challenges and dilemmas for those involved in supporting/caring roles. In this paper, the author reflections on the implicatioins of the CRPD for the lives of people with learning disabilities, in particular those with profound needs and esplores whether it provides a genuinely coherent framework for an inclusive society.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)218-231
Number of pages13
JournalEthics and Social Welfare
Volume7
Issue number3
Early online date2 Sep 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • disability, rights ethics

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