Throwing the baby out with the bath water? The impact of coalition reforms on identifying sub-national transport priorities in England

Ian Stafford, Sarah Ayres

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
306 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The coalition government has set out plans to dismantle the regional tier and return powers to localities and Whitehall departments. These changes will have significant implications for the way in which transport policy is formulated and delivered in England. When in power, New Labour introduced a range of measures to strengthen governance arrangements for promoting a more joined-up and decentralised approach to transport policy, including Regional Funding Allocations (RFAs). This paper examines the opportunities and limitations of the RFA process and considers the consequences of removing these regional structures for transport policy in England. We conclude that important progress made in recent years to develop effective arrangements for identifying transport priorities at the sub-national tier could be derailed by the Coalition’s intention to remove regional governance structures in their entirety.
Translated title of the contributionThrowing the baby out with the bath water? The impact of coalition reforms on identifying sub-national transport priorities in England
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-155
Number of pages23
JournalLocal Government Studies
Volume39
Issue number1
Early online date30 May 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Structured keywords

  • PolicyBristol
  • governance
  • transport
  • decentralisation
  • inter-governmental relations

Keywords

  • decentralisation
  • governance
  • transport
  • Whitehall
  • inter-governmental relations
  • regions
  • localism
  • transport policy
  • regional funding allocations
  • England

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