Skip to content

Tool use and social homophily among male bottlenose dolphins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Tool use and social homophily among male bottlenose dolphins. / Bizzozzero, M. R.; Allen, S. J.; Gerber, L.; Wild, S.; King, S. L.; Connor, R. C.; Friedman, W. R.; Wittwer, S.; Krützen, M.

In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 286, No. 1904, 20190898, 12.06.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Bizzozzero, MR, Allen, SJ, Gerber, L, Wild, S, King, SL, Connor, RC, Friedman, WR, Wittwer, S & Krützen, M 2019, 'Tool use and social homophily among male bottlenose dolphins', Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, vol. 286, no. 1904, 20190898. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2019.0898

APA

Bizzozzero, M. R., Allen, S. J., Gerber, L., Wild, S., King, S. L., Connor, R. C., ... Krützen, M. (2019). Tool use and social homophily among male bottlenose dolphins. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 286(1904), [20190898]. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2019.0898

Vancouver

Bizzozzero MR, Allen SJ, Gerber L, Wild S, King SL, Connor RC et al. Tool use and social homophily among male bottlenose dolphins. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 2019 Jun 12;286(1904). 20190898. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2019.0898

Author

Bizzozzero, M. R. ; Allen, S. J. ; Gerber, L. ; Wild, S. ; King, S. L. ; Connor, R. C. ; Friedman, W. R. ; Wittwer, S. ; Krützen, M. / Tool use and social homophily among male bottlenose dolphins. In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 2019 ; Vol. 286, No. 1904.

Bibtex

@article{439fb09a043740678ef0ecbdb097fff8,
title = "Tool use and social homophily among male bottlenose dolphins",
abstract = "Homophilous behaviour plays a central role in the formation of human friendships. Individuals form social ties with others that show similar phe-notypic traits, independently of relatedness. Evidence of such homophily can be found in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) in Shark Bay, Western Australia, where females that use marine sponges as foraging tools often associate with other females that use sponges. 'Sponging' is a socially learned, time-consuming behaviour, transmitted from mother to calf. Previous research illustrated a strong female bias in adopting this technique. The lower propensity for males to engage in sponging may be due to its incompatibility with adult male-specific behaviours, particularly the formation of multi-level alliances. However, the link between sponging and male behaviour has never been formally tested. Here, we show that male spongers associated significantly more often with other male spongers irrespective of their level of relatedness. Male spongers spent significantly more time foraging, and less time resting and travelling, than did male non-spongers. Interestingly, we found no difference in time spent socializing. Our study provides novel insights into the relationship between tool use and activity budgets of male dolphins, and indicates social homophily in the second-order alliance composition of tool-using bottlenose dolphins.",
keywords = "Activity budget, Alliance formation, Bottlenose dolphins, Homophily, Social networks, Tool use",
author = "Bizzozzero, {M. R.} and Allen, {S. J.} and L. Gerber and S. Wild and King, {S. L.} and Connor, {R. C.} and Friedman, {W. R.} and S. Wittwer and M. Kr{\"u}tzen",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1098/rspb.2019.0898",
language = "English",
volume = "286",
journal = "Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences",
issn = "0962-8452",
publisher = "The Royal Society",
number = "1904",

}

RIS - suitable for import to EndNote

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tool use and social homophily among male bottlenose dolphins

AU - Bizzozzero, M. R.

AU - Allen, S. J.

AU - Gerber, L.

AU - Wild, S.

AU - King, S. L.

AU - Connor, R. C.

AU - Friedman, W. R.

AU - Wittwer, S.

AU - Krützen, M.

PY - 2019/6/12

Y1 - 2019/6/12

N2 - Homophilous behaviour plays a central role in the formation of human friendships. Individuals form social ties with others that show similar phe-notypic traits, independently of relatedness. Evidence of such homophily can be found in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) in Shark Bay, Western Australia, where females that use marine sponges as foraging tools often associate with other females that use sponges. 'Sponging' is a socially learned, time-consuming behaviour, transmitted from mother to calf. Previous research illustrated a strong female bias in adopting this technique. The lower propensity for males to engage in sponging may be due to its incompatibility with adult male-specific behaviours, particularly the formation of multi-level alliances. However, the link between sponging and male behaviour has never been formally tested. Here, we show that male spongers associated significantly more often with other male spongers irrespective of their level of relatedness. Male spongers spent significantly more time foraging, and less time resting and travelling, than did male non-spongers. Interestingly, we found no difference in time spent socializing. Our study provides novel insights into the relationship between tool use and activity budgets of male dolphins, and indicates social homophily in the second-order alliance composition of tool-using bottlenose dolphins.

AB - Homophilous behaviour plays a central role in the formation of human friendships. Individuals form social ties with others that show similar phe-notypic traits, independently of relatedness. Evidence of such homophily can be found in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) in Shark Bay, Western Australia, where females that use marine sponges as foraging tools often associate with other females that use sponges. 'Sponging' is a socially learned, time-consuming behaviour, transmitted from mother to calf. Previous research illustrated a strong female bias in adopting this technique. The lower propensity for males to engage in sponging may be due to its incompatibility with adult male-specific behaviours, particularly the formation of multi-level alliances. However, the link between sponging and male behaviour has never been formally tested. Here, we show that male spongers associated significantly more often with other male spongers irrespective of their level of relatedness. Male spongers spent significantly more time foraging, and less time resting and travelling, than did male non-spongers. Interestingly, we found no difference in time spent socializing. Our study provides novel insights into the relationship between tool use and activity budgets of male dolphins, and indicates social homophily in the second-order alliance composition of tool-using bottlenose dolphins.

KW - Activity budget

KW - Alliance formation

KW - Bottlenose dolphins

KW - Homophily

KW - Social networks

KW - Tool use

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85067338837&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1098/rspb.2019.0898

DO - 10.1098/rspb.2019.0898

M3 - Article

C2 - 31185859

AN - SCOPUS:85067338837

VL - 286

JO - Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

JF - Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

SN - 0962-8452

IS - 1904

M1 - 20190898

ER -