Topography and the Hydraulic Mission: Water management, river control and state power in Nepal

Daniel Haines, Matthew Innis England

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
84 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

We examine the Nepali state’s role in water management over time and space. Using the hydraulic mission model, we use historical material, policy documents and interviews. From the 1800s, state water management concentrated on the Kathmandu valley. The 1960s witnessed the hydraulic mission launch in the lowlands through construction of public irrigation canals. Since the 1990s, a
consolidating hydraulic mission climbed to the hills and mountains through hydropower development. We argue that over time, topography played a determining role in application of state power and water control through infrastructure development, and that attention to geography helps refine the hydraulic mission model.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages40
JournalInternational Journal of Water Resources Development
Early online date8 Oct 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 8 Oct 2018

Structured keywords

  • Centre for Environmental Humanities
  • Cabot Institute Water Research

Keywords

  • Nepal
  • South Asia
  • Interdisciplinary collaboration
  • Hydropolitics
  • Environmental History
  • Policy Studies
  • GCRF

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