Total phosphorus records in coastal Antarctic sediments: burial and evidence of anthropogenic influence on recent input

Felipe Sales de Freitas, Rosalinda Montone, Eunice Machado, Cesar Martins*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
31 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Total phosphorus (TP) records reflect variations in input and burial of organic matter (OM) in coastal and shelf sediments. At Antarctic regions, TP levels are often derived from natural sources; however, with emergent human pressure at these regions, anthropogenic sources of TP may play an important role. At the Antarctic Peninsula, Admiralty Bay attracts great scientific and touristic interest, especially during austral summer months, thus being vulnerable to human activities. Currently, only scarce spatial distributions of TP are available for this key region, whereas no vertical distributions have been determined. To fill this gap, we investigated short (< 20 cm) sediment cores in ten areas along Admiralty Bay for TP contents. We produced the first TP vertical distributions and established site-specific background values (from 492 ± 13 to 932 ± 17 μg g−1), which are related to hydrodynamics, sedimentology, and natural inputs of P. We observed a gradual surface TP enrichment at all sites, mainly due to input of fresh OM. Benefiting from our background values, we employ the Phosphorus Pollution Index (PPI) to assess possible human impacts. Generally, the increase of PPI suggests natural inputs of P. However, PPI ≥ 1.3 found at the nearby Comandante Ferraz Research Station (Brazil) can be linked to recent (past 2–3 decades) treated sewage inputs in Martel Inlet. We suggest PPI as a proxy for preliminary assessments of anthropogenic impacts in coastal Antarctic regions experiencing increased human pressure.
Original languageEnglish
Article number104037
Number of pages8
JournalMarine Chemistry
Volume237
Early online date11 Oct 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Dec 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The work was supported by the Antarctic Brazilian Program (PROANTAR), Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq, 557306/2005-1, 550014/2007-1 and 442692/2018-8) and Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Ensino Superior (CAPES). F.S. Freitas thanks IC Scholarship (PIBIC/CNPq) and funding from UKRI-NERC. The authors wish to thank the Brazilian Antarctic Station staff for their support during the sampling program. Finally, this work is part of CARBMET project (The multiple faces of organic CARBon and METals in the sub-Antarctic ecosystem) sponsored by CNPq , CAPES and Brazilian Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation .

Funding Information:
The work was supported by the Antarctic Brazilian Program (PROANTAR), Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cient?fico e Tecnol?gico (CNPq, 557306/2005-1, 550014/2007-1 and 442692/2018-8) and Coordena??o de Aperfei?oamento de Pessoal de Ensino Superior (CAPES). F.S. Freitas thanks IC Scholarship (PIBIC/CNPq) and funding from UKRI-NERC. The authors wish to thank the Brazilian Antarctic Station staff for their support during the sampling program. Finally, this work is part of CARBMET project (The multiple faces of organic CARBon and METals in the sub-Antarctic ecosystem) sponsored by CNPq, CAPES and Brazilian Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • Organic matter
  • Phosphorus pollution index
  • Environmental changes
  • Admiralty Bay
  • Southern Ocean

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