Treatment of intrahepatic congenital portosystemic shunts in dogs: a systematic review

Mickey Tivers, Victoria J Lipscomb, Daniel J. Brockman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
234 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objectives: To establish the evidence base for the treatment of intrahepatic congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) in dogs.
Methods: A systematic review of the literature relating to the treatment of intrahepatic CPSS in dogs was performed. Studies were filtered for evidence to answer the question “Which of the treatment options for intrahepatic CPSS in dogs offers the best short and long term outcome?” Studies were assigned a level of evidence based on a system published by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine.
Results: Thirty-two studies were included in the review. Twenty-six provided level 4 evidence and six provided level 5 evidence. There were no level 1, 2 or 3 The aim of this study was to establish the evidence base for the treatment of intrahepatic congenital portosystemic shunts in dogs through a systematic review of the pertinent literature. Studies were filtered for evidence to answer the question “Which of the treatment options for intrahepatic CPSS in dogs offers the best short- and long-term outcome?” Studies were assigned a level of evidence based on a system published by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. Thirty-two studies were included in the review. Twenty-six provided level 4 evidence and six provided level 5 evidence. There were no level 1, 2 or 3 studies. One study compared surgical treatment with medical management and one study compared suture ligation with ameroid constrictor placement. The remaining studies were case series describing the outcome for one treatment method alone. Methods and timings of assessments of short- and long-term outcomes were highly varied, making direct comparisons challenging. The evidence regarding the treatment of intrahepatic congenital portosystemic shunts in dogs is weak, with only two studies directly comparing treatments. There is a lack of evidence regarding short- and long-term outcomes on which to base clinical decisions.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Small Animal Practice
Early online date20 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 20 Jul 2017

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