Trends in outcomes used to measure the effectiveness of UK-based support interventions and services targeted at adults with experience of domestic and sexual violence and abuse: A scoping review

Sophie Carlisle*, Annie Bunce, A Matthew Prina, Elizabeth Cook, Estela Capelas Barbosa, Sally McManus, Gene S Feder, Natalia Lewis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

Objectives: In the UK, a range of support services and interventions are available to people who have experienced or perpetrated domestic and sexual violence and abuse (DSVA). However, it is currently not clear which outcomes and outcome measures are used to assess their effectiveness. The objective of this review is to summarise, map and identify trends in outcome measures in evaluations of DSVA services and interventions in the UK.

Design: Scoping review.

Data sources: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Social Policy and Practice, ASSIA, IBSS, Sociological abstracts and SSCI electronic databases were searched from inception until 21st June 2022. Grey literature sources were identified and searched.

Eligibility: We included randomised controlled trials, non-randomised comparative studies, pre-post studies and service evaluations, with at least one outcome relating to the effectiveness of the support intervention or service for people who have experienced and/or perpetrated DSVA. Outcomes had to be assessed at baseline and at least one more time-point, or compared to a comparison group.

Charting methods: Outcome measures were extracted, iteratively thematically grouped into categories, domains and subdomains, and trends were explored.
Results: 80 studies reporting 87 DSVA interventions or services were included. A total of 426 outcome measures were extracted, of which 200 were used more than once. The most commonly reported outcome subdomain was DSVA perpetration. Cessation of abuse according to the Severity of Abuse Grid was the most common individual outcome. Analysis of temporal trends showed that the number of studies and outcomes used has increased since the 1990s.

Conclusions: Our findings highlight inconsistencies between studies in outcome measurement. The increase in the number of studies and variety of measures suggests that as evaluation of DSVA services and interventions matures, there is an increased need for a core of common, reliable metrics to aid comparability.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere074452
Number of pages15
JournalBMJ Open
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Apr 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2024. Re-use permitted under CC BY. Published by BMJ.

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