Tutor perception of student engagement regarding task-based learning in medical anatomy: Abstract presented at Winter Meeting of the Anatomical Society 2017, Dundee, UK

Daisy Ryan, Sarah Allsop

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference Abstract

Abstract

Interactive tasks or 'games' are increasingly used within medical education: the principal goal is neither amusement nor pleasure – rather employment of different tactics to stimulate learning through novel means. Several such games are employed throughout the teaching of anatomy at the University of Bristol. This designed game, focused on the anatomy of the respiratory system, ran during teaching in the Human Dissection laboratory and was facilitated by four Anatomy Demonstrators. Complete bony thoraces were wrapped in cling-film, to allow partakers to draw pleural markings and fissures onto the skeletons while considering their clinical importance. Instructions regarding task completion and intended learning outcomes were provided to participants. The task was used for two cohorts at different stages of their medical career – second year medical students (Yr2) and second year foundation doctors (FY2). Students worked in groups of five to complete the assignment. We then ran a focus group of anatomy staff to review participant engagement in the task. Good engagement was observed in both undergraduate and postgraduate groups; however, differences were seen in the form that engagement took. Yr2 students approached the task cautiously: reluctant to mark the specimens, appearing to spend longer considering task instructions prior to action. In contrast, FY2s were more assertive: prioritising task completion over accuracy of markings. Our findings correlate with current literature, suggesting there are differences in undergraduate and postgraduate groups' approach to interactive tasks. Future work should acknowledge this diversity when devising and implementing such games and consideration given to make these sessions effective. This project was a teaching evaluation tool; a research ethics review was not required, but good ethical principles were adhered to throughout.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 28 Nov 2017

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