Uncoupling of behavioral and autonomic responses after lesions of the primate orbitofrontal cortex

Y. L. Reekie, K. Braesicke, M. S. Man, A. C. Roberts*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Successful adaptation to changes in an animal's emotional and motivational environment depends on behavioral flexibility accompanied by changes in bodily responses, e.g., autonomic and endocrine, which support the change in behavior. Here, we identify the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) as pivotal in the flexible regulation and coordination of behavioral and autonomic responses during adaptation. Using an appetitive Pavlovian task, we demonstrate that OFC lesions in the marmoset (i) impair an animal's ability to rapidly suppress its appetitive cardiovascular arousal upon termination of a conditioned stimulus and (ii) cause an uncoupling of the behavioral and autonomic components of the adaptive response after reversal of the reward contingencies. These findings highlight the role of the OFC in emotional regulation and are highly relevant to our understanding of disorders such as schizophrenia and autism in which uncoupling of emotional responses may contribute to the experiential distress and disadvantageous behavior associated with these disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9787-9792
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume105
Issue number28
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jul 2008

Keywords

  • behavioral inhibition
  • emotion
  • reversal learning
  • PREFRONTAL CORTICAL PROJECTIONS
  • CENTRAL NUCLEUS FUNCTION
  • BASOLATERAL AMYGDALA
  • INFRALIMBIC CORTEX
  • MACAQUE MONKEYS
  • FRONTAL-CORTEX
  • RHESUS-MONKEYS
  • LONGITUDINAL COLUMNS
  • PERIAQUEDUCTAL GRAY
  • EXTINCTION

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