Understanding how cystic fibrosis mutations disrupt CFTR function: from single molecules to animal models

Yiting Wang, Joe A Wrennall, Zhiwei Cai, Hongyu Li, David N. Sheppard*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Defective epithelial ion transport is the hallmark of the life-limiting genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). This abnormality is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the ATP-binding cassette transporter that functions as a ligand-gated anion channel. Since the identification of the CFTR gene, almost 2000 disease-causing mutations associated with a spectrum of clinical phenotypes have been reported, but the majority remain poorly characterised. Studies of a small number of mutations including the most common, F508del-CFTR, have identified six general mechanisms of CFTR dysfunction. Here, we review selectively progress to understand how CF mutations disrupt CFTR processing, stability and function. We explore CFTR structure and function to explain the molecular mechanisms of CFTR dysfunction and highlight new knowledge of disease pathophysiology emerging from large animal models of CF. Understanding CFTR dysfunction is crucial to the development of transformational therapies for CF patients. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-57
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology
Volume52
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2014

Keywords

  • CFTR
  • Chloride ion channel
  • Cystic fibrosis mutations
  • F508del-CFTR
  • CFTR knockout pigs
  • TRANSMEMBRANE CONDUCTANCE REGULATOR
  • NUCLEOTIDE-BINDING DOMAIN
  • CHLORIDE CHANNEL PORE
  • DISEASE-ASSOCIATED MUTATIONS
  • MEMBRANE-SPANNING DOMAINS
  • AIRWAY EPITHELIAL-CELLS
  • CL-CHANNELS
  • DELTA-F508 CFTR
  • ANION SELECTIVITY
  • PLASMA-MEMBRANE

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