Understanding Interprofessional Education as an intergroup encounter: The use of contact theory in programme planning.

John S W Carpenter, Claire Dickinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

15 Citations (Scopus)
565 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

A key underlying assumption of interprofessional education (IPE) is that if the professions are brought together they have the opportunity to learn about each other and dispel the negative stereotypes which are presumed to hamper interprofessional collaboration in practice. This paper reviews the application of the ‘contact hypothesis’ (Allport, 1954) in IPE and the findings of eight evaluation studies (1995-2012) which adopted this theoretical perspective. It proposes that educators should pay explicit attention to an intergroup perspective in designing IPE programmes and specifically to the ‘contact variables’ identified by social psychologists studying inter-group encounters. This would increase the chances of the planned contact having a positive effect on attitude change.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)103
Number of pages108
JournalJournal of Interprofessional Care
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2016

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