Understanding user communities from social network data

Alastair Gill, Emma L. Tonkin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Contribution (Conference Proceeding)

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Abstract

Understanding user communities and identifying change within them is important for a range of organisations, including those concerned with cultural heritage. In this paper we present an exploratory study which uses dynamic social network analysis of posts from the Tumblr blogging site relating to the Tate galleries to observe user community change. In addition, we apply two
versions of topic modeling to the text of the posts in order to examine user community concerns and changes within these over time. In general, the most noticeable changes in topics within the user communities tends to occur when there has been a major physical change in the social network, such as an increase in membership, with these new members bringing new concerns and
interests. After summarising the findings of our approach in detail, we propose practical methods which could be incorporated in to real time monitoring of user community change by cultural heritage organisations.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationJoint Proceedings of the Posters and Demos Track of the 12th International Conference on Semantic Systems - SEMANTiCS2016 and the 1st International Workshop on Semantic Change & Evolving Semantics (SuCCESS'16)
PublisherCEUR Workshop Proceedings
Number of pages8
Volume1695
Publication statusPublished - 30 Sep 2016
EventEvolving Semantics: Workshop at SEMANTiCs 2016: 12th International Conference on Semantic Systems - Leipzig, Germany
Duration: 12 Sep 201615 Sep 2016

Conference

ConferenceEvolving Semantics
CountryGermany
CityLeipzig
Period12/09/1615/09/16

Keywords

  • semantic change
  • digital preservation
  • social network
  • dynamic social network
  • topic modelling
  • cultural heritage

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