Universal Human Rights? Breaking the Institutional Barriers Facing Climate-Vulnerable Small-Island Developing States

Alice Venn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

1 Citation (Scopus)
217 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

There is a need to overcome the dichotomy in international responses to climate change between, on the one hand, a recognition of the significant threat posed by climate impacts for the continued enjoyment of fundamental rights, and, on the other, the lack of provision made for strengthening the legal protections available to climate-vulnerable states. The question of access to human-rights mechanisms currently looms large as a limitation on legal action within, or by, Small-Island Developing States.

This article, drawing on empirical research conducted in Vanuatu and Fiji, examines the entrenched institutional barriers to engagement with the core international human rights treaties in the South Pacific. A number of steps are proposed to guide action by the international community, through funding strategies, integrated vulnerability assessments, and targeted in-country capacity building, in order to enable more effective engagement with rights mechanisms and offer greater recourse to justice.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)322-346
Number of pages25
JournalClimate Law
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Nov 2017

Keywords

  • Small Island Developing States (SIDS) – South Pacific – institutional barriers – human rights – climate finance – capacity building
  • South Pacific
  • institutional barriers
  • capacity building
  • human rights

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Universal Human Rights? Breaking the Institutional Barriers Facing Climate-Vulnerable Small-Island Developing States'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this