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Using photography in 'The Restaurant of the Future'. A useful way to assess portion selection and plate cleaning?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31-35
Number of pages5
JournalAppetite
Volume63
DOIs
DatePublished - 1 Apr 2013

Abstract

Laboratory-based studies of human dietary behaviour benefit from highly controlled conditions; however, this approach can lack ecological validity. Identifying a reliable method to capture and quantify natural dietary behaviours represents an important challenge for researchers. In this study, we scrutinised cafeteria-style meals in the 'Restaurant of the Future.' Self-selected meals were weighed and photographed, both before and after consumption. Using standard portions of the same foods, these images were independently coded to produce accurate and reliable estimates of (i) initial self-served portions, and (ii) food remaining at the end of the meal. Plate cleaning was extremely common; in 86% of meals at least 90% of self-selected calories were consumed. Males ate a greater proportion of their self-selected meals than did females. Finally, when participants visited the restaurant more than once, the correspondence between selected portions was better predicted by the weight of the meal than by its energy content. These findings illustrate the potential benefits of meal photography in this context. However, they also highlight significant limitations, in particular, the need to exclude large amounts of data when one food obscures another. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Additional information

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Structured keywords

  • CRICBristol
  • Brain and Behaviour
  • Nutrition and Behaviour

    Research areas

  • Portion size, Food images, Meal size, Plate cleaning, Food intake, AFFECTS ENERGY-INTAKE, NORMAL-WEIGHT WOMEN, FOOD PHOTOGRAPHS, DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY, SIZE, CONSUMPTION, OVERWEIGHT, ACCURACY, BEHAVIOR, DENSITY

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