Uterotonic Drugs for the Prevention of Postpartum Haemorrhage: A Cost‐Effectiveness Analysis

Karen Pickering, Ioannis D. Gallos, Helen M Williams, Malcom J Price, Abi Merriel, David Lissauer, Aurelio Tobias, G Justus Hofmeyr, Arri Coomarasamy, Tracy Roberts

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Abstract

Objective The objective of this study was to estimate the relative cost effectiveness for the full range of uterotonic drugs available for preventing postpartum haemorrhage (PPH).
Methods A model-based economic evaluation was constructed using effectiveness data from a network meta-analysis, and supplemented by the literature. A UK National Health Service (NHS) perspective was adopted for the analysis, which is based on UK costs from published sources. The primary outcome measure is cost per case of PPH avoided (≥ 500 mL blood loss), with secondary outcome measures of cost per case of severe PPH avoided (≥ 1000 mL) and cost per major outcome (surgery) averted also being analysed.
Results Carbetocin is shown to be the most effective strategy. Excluding adverse events, ‘ergometrine plus oxytocin’ was shown to be the least costly strategy. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for prevention of PPH with carbetocin com- pared with prevention with ‘ergometrine plus oxytocin’ was £1889 per case of PPH ≥ 500 mL avoided; £30,013 per case of PPH ≥ 1000 mL avoided; and £1,172,378 per major outcome averted. Including adverse events in the analysis showed oxy- tocin to be the least costly strategy. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for prevention of PPH with carbetocin compared with prevention with oxytocin was £928 per case of PPH ≥ 500 mL avoided; £22,900 per case of PPH ≥ 1000 mL avoided; and £894,514 per major outcome averted.
Conclusion The results suggest carbetocin, oxytocin and ‘ergometrine plus oxytocin’ could all be favourable options for being the most cost-effective strategy for preventing PPH. Carbetocin could be the preferred choice, especially if the price of carbetocin decreased. Mixed findings mean a clear-cut conclusion cannot be made as to which uterotonic is the most cost effective. Future research should focus on collecting more robust evidence on the probability of having adverse events from the uterotonic drugs, and on adapting the model for low- and middle-income countries.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages14
JournalPharmacoEconomics - Open
Early online date30 Nov 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 30 Nov 2018

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