Validating childhood asthma in an epidemiological study using linked electronic patient records

Rosie P Cornish, A J W Henderson, Andrew W. Boyd, Raquel Granell, Tjeerd Van Staa, John A A Macleod

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the performance of parent-reported data in identifying physician-confirmed asthma.

DESIGN AND SETTING: Validation study using linkage between the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) and electronic patient records held within the General Practice Research Database (GPRD).

PARTICIPANTS: Participants were those eligible to participate in ALSPAC who also had a record in the GPRD; this included 765 individuals, just under 4% of ALSPAC-eligible participants. The analysis was based on 141 participants with complete parent-reported asthma data.

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The main GPRD outcome measure was whether a child had a diagnosis of asthma before they were nine. Parent-reported measures were doctor diagnosis of asthma (before mean age 7.5 years), various outcomes based on wheezing and breathlessness recorded longitudinally between 6 months and 8.5 years. Secondary outcomes were bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR), forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity ratio and skin prick test responses.

RESULTS: Among the 141 participants with complete parent-reported data, 26 (18%) had an asthma diagnosis before age nine. Using general practitioner (GP)-recorded asthma as the gold standard, the question 'Has a doctor ever diagnosed your child with asthma?' was both sensitive (88.5%) and specific (95.7%). 'Ever wheezed' had the highest sensitivity (100%) but low specificity (60%). More specific definitions were obtained by restricting to those who had wheezed on more than one occasion, experienced frequent wheeze and/or wheezed after the age of 3, but these measures had low sensitivities. BHR only identified 50% of those with a GP-recorded diagnosis.

CONCLUSIONS: Parental reports of a doctor's diagnosis agree well with a GP-recorded diagnosis. High specificity for asthma can be achieved by using detailed wheezing questions, although these definitions are likely to exclude mild cases of asthma. Our study shows that linkage between observational studies and electronic patient records has the potential to enhance epidemiological research.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere005345
Number of pages6
JournalBMJ Open
Volume4
Issue number4
Early online date23 Apr 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Primary Care
  • bronchial hyperresponsiveness
  • diagnosed asthma
  • questionnaire
  • children
  • wheeze
  • Isaac
  • population
  • allergies
  • life

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