Vitamin D(2) supplementation induces the development of aortic stenosis in rabbits: interactions with endothelial function and thioredoxin-interacting protein

Doan T M Ngo, Irene Stafford, Darren J Kelly, Aaron L Sverdlov, Ronald D Wuttke, Helen Weedon, Angus K Nightingale, Anke C Rosenkranz, Malcolm D Smith, Yuliy Y Chirkov, Jennifer A Kennedy, John D Horowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding of the pathophysiology of aortic valve stenosis (AVS) and finding potentially effective treatments are impeded by the lack of suitable AVS animal models. A previous study demonstrated the development of AVS in rabbits with vitamin D(2) and cholesterol supplementation without any hemodynamic changes in the cholesterol supplemented group alone. The current study aimed to determine whether AVS develops in an animal model with vitamin D(2) supplementation alone, and to explore pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this process. The effects of 8 weeks' treatment with vitamin D(2) alone (n=8) at 25,000 IU/4 days weekly on aortic valve structure and function were examined in male New Zealand white rabbits. Echocardiographic aortic valve backscatter (AV(BS)), transvalvular velocity, and transvalvular pressure gradient were utilized to quantitate changes in valve structure and function. Valvular histology/immunochemistry and function were examined after 8 weeks. Changes in valves were compared with those in endothelial function and in valvular measurement of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP), a marker/mediator of reactive oxygen species-induced oxidative stress. Vitamin D(2) treated rabbits developed AVS with increased AV(BS) (17.6+/-1.4 dB vs 6.7+/-0.8 dB, P
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)290-6
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Pharmacology
Volume590
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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