Wages, experience, and training of women over the life cycle

Richard Blundell, Monica Costa-Dias, David Goll, Costas Meghir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

We investigate the role of training in reducing the gender wage gap using the British Household Panel Survey. On the basis of a lifecycle model and using tax and welfare benefit reforms as a source of exogenous variation, we evaluate the role of formal training and experience in defining the evolution of wages and employment careers, conditional on education. Training is potentially important in compensating for the effects of children, especially for women who left education after completing high school, but does not fundamentally change the wage gap resulting from labor market interruptions following child birth.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S275-S315
JournalJournal of Labor Economics
Volume39
Issue numberS1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
of Sussex, University of York, Bank of Spain, Birkbeck, and University College London for their many useful comments. Financial support from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) through the ESRC Centre for the Microeconomic Analysis of Public Policy at the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS; reference ES/M010147/1), from project grant ES/N015304/1, and from European Union Horizon 2020 program Dynamics of Inequality Across the Life-Course (DIAL; project 462-16-090) is gratefully acknowledged. Costas Meghir is grateful to the Cowles Foundation and the Institution for Social and Policy Studies (ISPS) at Yale for financial support. The usual disclaimer applies. Contact the corresponding author, Costas Meghir, at c.meghir@ yale.edu. Information concerning access to the data used in this paper is available as supplemental material online.

Funding Information:
We are very grateful to Michael Webb and William Elming for the many discussions and inputs at different stages of this project. We are also grateful to conference and seminar participants at German Institute for Economic Research (DIW)/ Berlin Social Science Center (WZB Berlin), Chicago Harris School, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics (CREST; ?cole Nationale de la Statistique et de l?Administration ?conomique [ENSAE Paris]), Luxembourg Institute of SocioEconomic Research (LISER), University of Bristol, University of Essex, University of Sussex, University of York, Bank of Spain, Birkbeck, and University College London for their many useful comments. Financial support from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) through the ESRC Centre for the Microeconomic Analysis of Public Policy at the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS; reference ES/M010147/1), from project grant ES/N015304/1, and from European Union Horizon 2020 program Dynamics of Inequality Across the Life-Course (DIAL; project 462-16-090) is gratefully acknowledged. Costas Meghir is grateful to the Cowles Foundation and the Institution for Social and Policy Studies (ISPS) at Yale for financial support. The usual disclaimer applies. Contact the corresponding author, Costas Meghir, at c.meghir@ yale.edu. Information concerning access to the data used in this paper is available as supplemental material online.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

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