Weight gain and sudden infant death syndrome: changes in weight z scores may identify infants at increased risk

Peter S Blair, Pamela S Nadin, Tim J Cole, Peter J Fleming, Iain J Smith, Martin Ward-Platt, P J Berry, Jean Golding

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

AIMS To investigate patterns of infant growth that may influence the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). DESIGN Three year population based case control study with parental interviews for each death and four age matched controls. Growth was measured from prospective weight observations using the British 1990 Growth Reference. SETTING Five regions in England (population greater than 17 million, more than 470 000 live births over three years). SUBJECTS 247 SIDS cases and 1110 controls. RESULTS The growth rate from birth to the final weight observation was significantly poorer among the SIDS infants despite controlling for potential confounders (SIDS mean change in weight z score (δzw) = −0.38 (SD 1.40)v controls = +0.22 (SD 1.10), multivariate: p < 0.0001). Weight gain was poorer among SIDS infants with a normal birth weight (above the 16th centile: odds ratio (OR) = 1.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.48–2.07, p < 0.0001) than for those with lower birth weight (OR = 1.09, 95% CI 0.61–1.95, p = 0.76). There was no evidence of increased growth retardation before death. CONCLUSIONS Poor postnatal weight gain was independently associated with an increased risk of SIDS and could be identified at the routine six week assessment.
Translated title of the contributionWeight gain and sudden infant death syndrome: changes in weight z scores may identify infants at increased risk
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)462-468
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Disease in Childhood
Volume82
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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