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What does justice mean to black and minority ethnic (BME) victims/survivors of gender-based violence?

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What does justice mean to black and minority ethnic (BME) victims/survivors of gender-based violence? / Gangoli, Geetanjali; Bates, Lis; Hester, Marianne.

In: Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 05.08.2019.

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@article{5af67aa35dd24a4e9563d44a7f38c501,
title = "What does justice mean to black and minority ethnic (BME) victims/survivors of gender-based violence?",
abstract = "This paper draws on research that looked at how ‘justice’ is understood, sought, and experienced by a wide range of victims/survivors of (GBV) (domestic violence, sexual violence, ‘honour-based’ violence and forced marriage) and by key practitioners working with those victims/survivors within the UK context. This paper focuses specifically on how Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) victims/survivors of GBV experience and conceptualise justice. The key aims of this paper are to explore (a) what are the experiences of GBV for BME victim/survivors, (b) what are their experiences and perceptions of justice, and (c) what factors enable, or pose barriers to justice for, women from BME backgrounds, and to what extent are these enablers or barriers mediated by immigration status. The paper situates BME women’s experience of GBV and conceptualisations of justice within an ecological approach (Hagemann-White et al., 2010; and see Hester and Lilley, 2014), and within Bourdieu’s conceptualisation of ‘social capital’ (1986). We found that migrant women lack access to vital aspects of social capital, that make access to justice particularly challenging, and that immigration status poses key barriers in migrant women’s experiences of accessing justice.",
keywords = "Black and Minority Ethnic women, immigration status, justice, ecological model",
author = "Geetanjali Gangoli and Lis Bates and Marianne Hester",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1080/1369183X.2019.1650010",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies",
issn = "1369-183X",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis Group",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - What does justice mean to black and minority ethnic (BME) victims/survivors of gender-based violence?

AU - Gangoli, Geetanjali

AU - Bates, Lis

AU - Hester, Marianne

PY - 2019/8/5

Y1 - 2019/8/5

N2 - This paper draws on research that looked at how ‘justice’ is understood, sought, and experienced by a wide range of victims/survivors of (GBV) (domestic violence, sexual violence, ‘honour-based’ violence and forced marriage) and by key practitioners working with those victims/survivors within the UK context. This paper focuses specifically on how Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) victims/survivors of GBV experience and conceptualise justice. The key aims of this paper are to explore (a) what are the experiences of GBV for BME victim/survivors, (b) what are their experiences and perceptions of justice, and (c) what factors enable, or pose barriers to justice for, women from BME backgrounds, and to what extent are these enablers or barriers mediated by immigration status. The paper situates BME women’s experience of GBV and conceptualisations of justice within an ecological approach (Hagemann-White et al., 2010; and see Hester and Lilley, 2014), and within Bourdieu’s conceptualisation of ‘social capital’ (1986). We found that migrant women lack access to vital aspects of social capital, that make access to justice particularly challenging, and that immigration status poses key barriers in migrant women’s experiences of accessing justice.

AB - This paper draws on research that looked at how ‘justice’ is understood, sought, and experienced by a wide range of victims/survivors of (GBV) (domestic violence, sexual violence, ‘honour-based’ violence and forced marriage) and by key practitioners working with those victims/survivors within the UK context. This paper focuses specifically on how Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) victims/survivors of GBV experience and conceptualise justice. The key aims of this paper are to explore (a) what are the experiences of GBV for BME victim/survivors, (b) what are their experiences and perceptions of justice, and (c) what factors enable, or pose barriers to justice for, women from BME backgrounds, and to what extent are these enablers or barriers mediated by immigration status. The paper situates BME women’s experience of GBV and conceptualisations of justice within an ecological approach (Hagemann-White et al., 2010; and see Hester and Lilley, 2014), and within Bourdieu’s conceptualisation of ‘social capital’ (1986). We found that migrant women lack access to vital aspects of social capital, that make access to justice particularly challenging, and that immigration status poses key barriers in migrant women’s experiences of accessing justice.

KW - Black and Minority Ethnic women

KW - immigration status

KW - justice

KW - ecological model

U2 - 10.1080/1369183X.2019.1650010

DO - 10.1080/1369183X.2019.1650010

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies

JF - Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies

SN - 1369-183X

ER -