What people with learning disabilities say helps them

Pauline Heslop, Fiona Macaulay

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter in a book

    Abstract

    Central to any of any work with people with learning disabilities who self-injure must be the views of people with learning disabilities themselves. To date, many of the interventions and approaches that have been used have been based on what professionals feel is most appropriate, or on past patterns of the provision of support. In this chapter, people with learning disabilities who self-injure present their views about what they think helps them in the short-term, both when they are feeling like self-injuring and after self-injuring. In later chapters, longer-term psychological interventions are well-described.

    Much of this chapter is based on the findings from research which has explored the views and experiences of people with learning disabilities who self-injure. We have already considered, in Chapter 5, how people with learning disabilities understand self-injury. In this chapter, we consider what support people wanted and what they thought would be helpful to their short-term needs. We also find out what support people had already received, and how helpful or otherwise people with learning disabilities had found this.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationUnderstanding and working with people with learning disabilities who self-injure
    EditorsPauline Heslop, Andrew Lovell
    Place of PublicationLondon
    PublisherJessica Kingsley Publishers
    Pages71-79
    ISBN (Electronic)9780857004437
    ISBN (Print)9781849052085
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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