Wives, Wags and Mothers….But What about Women MPs, Sex and Gender at the 2010 General Election

SL Childs, Rosie Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The UK general election of 2010 should have been a critical one for women. But it was not to be. Despite all of the main political parties claiming to want more women MPs the increase in their number relative to the 2005 Parliament was just 2.5%. Women remain under-represented numerically in the House of Commons, constituting less than one-quarter of all MPs. The election campaign was largely women free too, as women married to politicians gained more attention than women politicians. Moreover, and despite enhanced inter-party competition over the women's vote—or rather, and more accurately, the votes of middle income mothers, otherwise known as the ‘mumsnet’ vote—women's issues and perspectives were marginalised from the campaign proper.
Translated title of the contributionWives, Wags and Mothers….But What about Women MPs, Sex and Gender at the 2010 General Election
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)760 - 77
Number of pages17
JournalParliamentary affairs
Volume63, 4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2010

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Oxford University Press

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