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An immortalized adult human erythroid line facilitates sustainable and scalable generation of functional red cells

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Article number14750
Number of pages7
JournalNature Communications
Volume8
DOIs
DateAccepted/In press - 26 Jan 2017
DatePublished (current) - 14 Mar 2017

Abstract

With increasing worldwide demand for safe blood, there is much interest in generating red blood cells in vitro as an alternative clinical product. However, available methods for in vitro generation of red cells from adult and cord blood progenitors do not yet provide a sustainable supply, and current systems using pluripotent stem cells as progenitors do not generate viable red cells. We have taken an alternative approach, immortalizing early adult erythroblasts generating a stable line, which provides a continuous supply of red cells. The immortalized cells differentiate efficiently into mature, functional reticulocytes that can be isolated by filtration. Extensive characterization has not revealed any differences between these reticulocytes and in vitro-cultured adult reticulocytes functionally or at the molecular level, and importantly no aberrant protein expression. We demonstrate a feasible approach to the manufacture of red cells for clinical use from in vitro culture.

    Research areas

  • synthetic biology

    Structured keywords

  • Bristol BioDesign Institute
  • BrisSynBio

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    Rights statement: This is the final published version of the article (version of record). It first appeared online via Nature at https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms14750 . Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

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    Licence: CC BY

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    Rights statement: This is the final published version of the article (version of record). It first appeared online via Nature at https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms14750 . Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

    Final published version, 1 MB, PDF-document

    Licence: CC BY

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