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De novo targeting to the cytoplasmic and luminal side of bacterial microcompartments

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Article number3413
Number of pages11
JournalNature Communications
Volume9
DOIs
DateAccepted/In press - 31 Jul 2018
DatePublished (current) - 24 Aug 2018

Abstract

Bacterial microcompartments, BMCs, are proteinaceous organelles that encase a specific metabolic pathway within a semi-permeable protein shell. Short encapsulation peptides can direct cargo proteins to the lumen of the compartments. However, the fusion of such peptides to non-native proteins does not guarantee encapsulation and often causes aggregation. Here, we report an approach for targeting recombinant proteins to BMCs that utilizes specific de novo coiled-coil protein–protein interactions. Attachment of one coiled-coil module to PduA (a component of the BMC shell) allows targeting of a fluorescent protein fused to a cognate coiled-coil partner. This interaction takes place on the outer surface of the BMC. The redesign of PduA to generate an N-terminus on the luminal side of the BMC results in intact compartments to which proteins can still be targeted via the designed coiled-coil system. This study provides a strategy to display proteins on the surface or within the lumen of the BMCs.

    Structured keywords

  • Faculty of Science
  • BrisSynBio
  • Bristol BioDesign Institute

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    Rights statement: This is the final published version of the article (version of record). It first appeared online via Springer Nature at https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-05922-x . Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

    Final published version, 10 MB, PDF-document

    Licence: CC BY

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    Rights statement: This is the final published version of the article (version of record). It first appeared online via Springer Nature at https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-05922-x . Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

    Final published version, 3 MB, PDF-document

    Licence: CC BY

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